Introduction

Announcing an integration of linear scripts A, B, and C on Konosos.net.

There is considerable overlap among the three linear scripts.  Rather than create three dedicated websites, I am combining the three scripts on Konosos.net, which will eliminate redundancy and complex cross references to kanashi.net.  Due to the complexity of the task, the process is on an indefinite timeline. During this process, some links may be inaccessible if they have not been updated.  Please be patient while I streamline your research experience.


This website has been upgraded to Konosos.net because konoso.net is unavailable.  


11.22.14: Any decipherment is challenged by the need to preserve phonetic integrity.  Methodology may be defined by the manner in which this integrity is preserved.  Nevertheless, since the syllabic Greek of the Linear B language is very different from the alphabetic Greek of the classic and the modern languages, “something  must give” to allow the gaps to be bridged.  The larger scholastic community has endeavored to preserve the integrity of the vowels while allowing great latitude with the consonants; this approach has resulted in words such as σπέρμα (sperma) “seed” for pe-ma.  With the exception of some dialectal alternations, I largely disagree with this approach because it presumes that the early Greeks  lacked competence to represent the consonants of their language; I have conversely endeavored to preserve the integrity of the consonants while allowing great latitude with the vowels. One must bear in mind that, while Linear B has five vowels, alphabetic Greek has seven vowels, the sounds of which are interpreted in different ways by the numerous dialects. Consequently, my approach has resulted in words such as πῆμα (pema) “calamity, misery” for pe-ma.

As one may well imagine, the premises of these divergent approaches result in divergent conclusions. However, a key tenet of logic states that, if the premises are false, the conclusion(s) must then be false. Therefore, while I am always receptive to thoughtful debate, my primary concern is whether my premises and conclusions make “Greek sense“.  In the absence of cogent arguments to the contrary, I remain steadfast in my approach, even though I may be its only proponent.

Respectfully,
Gretchen E. Leonhardt

P.S.  For an alternate approach, visit Richard Vallance Janke’s Linear B, Knossos & Mycenae.

For further insight about the development of Greek, see The Meanings of Linear-Script Signs.



Greek sense: so, how am I doing? I thought that I would include a poll to encourage feedback. If this works well, watch for more polls in the future.

Richard Valance Janke and I have each published a decipherment of KN V 684.  However, since posting this poll, Janke elected to use Rita Roberts’ decipherment rather than his own. Please take a moment to review each decipherment– Roberts’ and Leonhardt’s–and then come back to vote.

 

1 Comment

Comments RSS

Log ins are not required to post comments. However, since your words may be quoted in scholarly articles, this forum requires that professional names be used to post comments. Please click "Edit/Change" to include credentials after your name. For example, you may say "Mary A. Smith: Harvard University, Associate Professor of Geography" or "John Jones: Independent Scholar, Historical Linguistics" or "Independent Scholar, General." Moreover, to promote scholarly excellence, this forum reserves the right to edit for clarity. Clear writing complements clear thinking.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s