The Decipherment of Linear B: KN Gg 702

· Linear B Decipherments

KN Gg 702

Offerings of Honey

Scribe 103

.1      pa-si-te-o-i  /                   me-ri     *209VAS   1
.2  da-pu2-ri-to-jo   /  po-ti-ni-ja     ‘me-ri’     *209VAS   1

1. *209 VAS | amphora
2.  da-pu2-ri-to-jo | †of Deborah, the prophetess of Israel
3.  me-ri | μάρι(ς) (maris) | a liquid measure
3.  me-ri | μερί(ς) (meris) | a contribution, *an offering
3.  me-ri | μελί (meli) | honey
4.  pa-si-te-o-i | *φασιταοί (pasitaoi) | *a crying peacock, which was sacred to Hera
5.  po-ti-ni-ja | πότνια (potnia) | lady, mistress (attested)

.1  *φασιταοί  /                   μερί   *amphora = 1

  • one offering (of honey)  (in the name) of (Hera)

.2  da-pu2-ri-to-jo   /  πότνια     ‘μερί’     *amphora = 1

  • one offering (of honey) to the mistress of Deborah

Notes:  At this time, while I do not understand the significance of the association between the peacock and Hera, I simply interpret Hera as the peacock’s deification.  Thus far, there is no Greek equivalent for da-pu2-ri-to-jo, which appears to be a Greek inflection of a borrowed word.  As mentioned in the Bible, דִּבְּר֥וּ dburh “Deborah”, as prophetess [Judges 4 and 5 KJV] and ruler of ancient Israel, was “Queen Bee” (or Bee Goddess); her priestesses were also known as Deborahs.  See du.pu2.re.  In Greek mythology, descendants of the Bee Goddess included Cybele, Demeter, and Rhea, who were known as the Melissae [“Bee Goddess”], from μέλισσα (Melissa) (Attic μέλιττα) “a bee”. 

References:

  1. Bee Goddess.  Temple of Theola.org.  Ret. on 20 Nov 2014.
  2. Chadwick, John et al. 1998. Corpus of Mycenaean Inscriptions from Knossos, Vol. IV (8000-9947). Cambridge University Press.

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