Linear B to Greek: o-re-i to o-ta-re-wo

· Linear B Lexicon

INDEX

LinB words
o-re-i | o-re-i.ja | o-ta-re-wo |

Greek words
ὅραι | ὄρεϊ | ὀρειάς | ὄστρειον | ὄστρειος | ὄστρεον | ὀστρεώ- |



o-re-i | ὅραι (orai) | to look, to observe, to see
o-re-i | ὄρεϊ (orei) | a hill, a mountain
KN B 7034 (Scribe unknown)
The meanings of these two words suggest that the ideas of observation and mountains are confounded. In context, o-re-i may refer to mountain spies.
07.28.16


o-re-i.ja | ὀρειά(ς) (oreias) | of or belonging to the mountains
o-re-a2 | ὀρειά(ς) (oreias) | of or belonging to the mountains
PY Ep 705 (Scribe 1) IPN
In context, o-re-i.ja refers to a person from the mountains.
07.28.16


o-ta-re-wo | ὄστρειο(ν) (ostreion) | oyster; purple pigment
o-ta-re-wo | ὄστρειο(ς) (ostreios) | purple
o-ta-re-wo | ὄ(σ)τρεο(ν) (ostreon) | oyster; purple pigment
o-ta-re-wo | ὀ(σ)τρεώ- (ostreo) | oyster
KN E 1035+ (Scribe unknown)  (Colors)
The process for extracting purple dye from oysters appears to be unknown, but it is said that this dye is not as colorfast as that obtained from the murex. Note that ὄστρεον appears to refer to both the oyster and the shell; ὀστεο- (osteo-) “bone” is prob. derived from ὀστρεώ-. Cf. ὀστάριον (ostarion) “a small bone”.  o-ta-re-wo / a-ma appears to refer to either purple flax, as supported by the grain (GRA) ideogram, or to linen that is to be dyed oyster purple. Note that a-ma is a LinA word in a LinB context; cf. 亜麻 ama “jute, linen”, which includes the determinative 麻 ma “flax, linseed; hemp”.
09.07.15

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