Linear B to Greek: pa-i-to to pa-ke-te-ri-ja

· Linear B Lexicon

INDEX

LinB words
pa-i-to | pa-ja-ni | pa-ja-ni-jo | pa-ka-na | pa-ke-te-ri-ja |

Greek words
παιᾶνις | παιᾱνίζω | σφάκτρια | σφάγνος | φαῖστος | Φαῖστος | φάσγανον



pa-i-to | φαῖ(σ)το(ς) (phaistos) | bright, shining
pa-i-to | Φαῖ(σ)το(ς) (Phaestos) (attested)
Knossos (Scribes 103, 117, 128, 130, 132, 136, 210, unknown)
LA pa.i.to and LB pa-i-to are universally believed to refer to Phaestos, the second largest palace center after Knossos; however, in the context of the LB sheep tablets, pa-i-to may simply refer to clean or disease-free animals. LB Scribe 117 is responsible for approximately 66% of approximately 50 entries at Knossos.
10.08.14


pa-ja-ni | παιᾶνι(ς) (paianis) | of or like a paean
KN Ap 639 (Scribe 103)
Cf. the Phaeacians, who were known for their performances. See pi-ja-ni-jo.
07.08.18


pa-ja-ni-jo | παιᾱνίζω (paianizo) | to chant the song of victory; to honor with paeans
KN Ep 354 (Scribe 222)
See pi-ja-ni.
07.08.18


pa-ka-na | † φάκανα for (σ)φάγνο(ς) (sphagnos) | sword
pa-ka-na | † φάκανα for φά(σ)γανο(ν) (phasganon) | † a knife, a sacrificial knife; a sword
KN Ra 1540, 1541, 1548, 1550, 1551 (Scribe 126)
φάσγανον is probably a metathesis of σφάγνος “sword”.  Cf. σφαγίς (sphagis) “sacrificial knife” from σφάζω (sphazo) “to slaughter, to slay by cutting the throat”. Cf. also esophagus from φάγος (phagos) “glutton”. Early evidence for σφάγνος and σφαγίς may be found in sa-pa-ke-ti-ri-ja [KN C 941+] > σφάκτρια (sphaktria) “a priestess”, the feminine form of σφάκτης (sphaktes) “slayer” as “sacrificer”. pa-ka-na may further be related to the alt. pa-ke-te-ri-ja [MY Wt 506] for sa-pa-ke-ti-ri-ja.
09.17.14


pa-ke-te-ri-ja | σφάκτρια (sphaktria) | a priestess
MY Wt 506 (Scribe 65)
pa-ke-te-ri-ja appears to be the feminine form of σφάκτης (sphaktes) “slayer” as “sacrificer”.  See alt. sa-pa-ke-ti-ri-ja;  see also pa-ka-na.
02.09.17

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