Linear C to Greek: ni-ko-la-o-se to ni-ko-la-wo

· Linear C, Linear C Lexicon

INDEX
LinC words
ni-ko-la-o-se | ni-ko-la-wo |

Greek words
νικόλαος | †νικολάω



ni-ko-la-o-se | †νικόλαος (nikolaos) | victorious soldiers

  • ni-ko | νῖκος (nikos) | victory
  • la-o-se | λαός (laos) | men, people; soldiers
  • la-o-se | λεώς (leos) (Attic) | men, people; soldiers
  • la-o-se | ληός (leos) (Ionic) | men, people; soldiers

ICS 439
νῖκος is a later form of νίκη (nike).
This grafitto is written on a wall at Karnak in Egypt and is generally dated to the fourth century BCE.  While Masson [1961:382] presumes the given name, Νικόλαος “Nicholas”, I believe that the definition points to general bragging after a successful campaign.  Research may easily reveal the historic context of this declaration.  Given the plural reference,  Νικόλαος most likely referred to a leader rather than to a common individual.  Cf.  ni-ko-la-wo.
10.16.16 * 11.27.16


ni-ko-la-wo | † νικολάω (nikolao) | to desire victory

  • ni-ko | νῖκος (nikos) | victory
  • la-wo | λάω (lao) | (1) to hold, to seize; (2) to look, to perceive; †to behold; (3) to desire, to wish
  • la-wo | λαώ (lao) (Attic) | to be among the people

ICS 214
νῖκος is a later form of νίκη (nike).
λάω = θέλω (thelo), Doric λῶ (lo) “to desire”.
This declaration is painted on a tomb vase that was found in Tamassos.  In context, two possible tranlations for ni-ko-la-wo e-mi are possible: †νικολάω ἐμίν “I desire victory” and †νικολάω ἠμί (Attic) “I declare victory”.  Cf. ni-ko-la-o-se.
10.16.16

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